admin

admin

Dear medievalists,

If you've tried to register for the Society, or to renew your membership, you may've encountered some snags, and for that I apologize. Something seems to have gone wonky with our site due to come compatibility/versioning issues, and in order to let you pay online, I've had to come up with a work around. If you are renewing, you should be able to do so by logging in with your username and password, and choosing to renew from the menu there. Please use the links below if you are registering online for the first time:

1)  NEW members/paying online for the first time can make their payment via the following links:

Regular Membership, $57:

 https://www.canadianmedievalists.ca/index.php?option=com_users&view=registration&usage=1&processor=paypal&recurring=0&lang=en

 

Retired/Unemployed, $42:

https://www.canadianmedievalists.ca/index.php?option=com_users&view=registration&usage=2&processor=paypal&recurring=0&lang=en

 

Student, $37:

https://www.canadianmedievalists.ca/index.php?option=com_users&view=registration&usage=3&processor=paypal&recurring=0&lang=en

 

Sustaining, $125:

https://www.canadianmedievalists.ca/index.php?option=com_users&view=registration&usage=7&processor=paypal&recurring=0&lang=en

 

2) Renewing members can still log into the homepage, as per usual, and renew there from their profile. 

Thanks to all of you for your patience. And apologies, again, for any inconvenience. You can also renew via mail (oh, simpler days...). To get the form and mailing address, visit https://www.canadianmedievalists.ca/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=5&Itemid=228&lang=en

Best,

Andrew

 

 

The New College Conference on

Medieval & Renaissance Studies

The twenty-first biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 8–10 March 2018 in Sarasota, Florida.

The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics in European and Mediterranean history, literature, art, music and religion from the fourth to the seventeenth centuries. Interdisciplinary work is particularly appropriate to the conference’s broad historical and disciplinary scope. Planned sessions are also welcome.

The deadline for all abstracts is 15 September 2017; for submission guidelines or to submit an abstract, please go to http://www.newcollegeconference.org/cfp.

See the attached CFP for more details.

 

Canadian Society of Medievalists Annual Meeting Congress 2017 – CALL FOR PAPERS

 27-29 MAY 2017

RYERSON UNIVERSITY

TORONTO, ON 

 

 

 

The special theme for this year’s Congress is “From Far & Wide: The Next 150 Years/L’épopée d’une histoire: 150 ans vers l’avenir”, but papers for the CSM Annual Meeting can address any topic on medieval studies. Proposals for complete sessions are also invited, and special sessions seeking speakers include: 

1. Medieval art and architecture; 

2. 1417: The deposition of Avignon Pope Benedict XIII and the end of the Great Western Schism. 

 

Papers may be delivered in either English or French, and bilingual sessions are particularly welcome. 

Proposals should include a one-page abstract and a one-page curriculum vitae. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes' reading time. Please submit proposals by Sunday 22 January 2017 by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. If you prefer to send a paper copy, please post your proposal to the following address: 

Dominic Marner 

President, CSM 

SOFAM 

University of Guelph 

 

50 Stone Road East Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 Canada 

Canadian Society of Medievalists Annual Meeting Congress 2017 – CALL FOR PAPERS

 27-29 MAY 2017

RYERSON UNIVERSITY

TORONTO, ON 

 

 

 

The special theme for this year’s Congress is “From Far & Wide: The Next 150 Years/L’épopée d’une histoire: 150 ans vers l’avenir”, but papers for the CSM Annual Meeting can address any topic on medieval studies. Proposals for complete sessions are also invited, and special sessions seeking speakers include: 

1. Medieval art and architecture; 

2. 1417: The deposition of Avignon Pope Benedict XIII and the end of the Great Western Schism. 

 

Papers may be delivered in either English or French, and bilingual sessions are particularly welcome. 

Proposals should include a one-page abstract and a one-page curriculum vitae. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes' reading time. Please submit proposals by Sunday 22 January 2017 by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. If you prefer to send a paper copy, please post your proposal to the following address: 

Dominic Marner 

President, CSM 

SOFAM 

University of Guelph 

 

50 Stone Road East Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 Canada 

The 2016 Leonard Boyle Dissertation Prize

 

The competition for The 2016 Leonard Boyle Dissertation Prize for Medieval Studies is currently open. This prize will be awarded to an outstanding dissertation in any field of medieval studies. The dissertation must be written by a Canadian or by someone resident in Canada. Entries are adjudicated by the Dissertation Prize Committee, a subcommittee of the Canadian Society of Medievalists (CSM). The prize consists of a cash award as well as a membership in the CSM for three years. Members automatically receive copies of the journal Florilegium and the CSM's newsletter “Scrinium.”

 

For the current competition, new PhD holders who defended their dissertations in 2016[1]  are invited to submit their work. For consideration in the competition, an applicant should submit the following documents by January 15, 2017, to the Chair of the Committee: (a) one paper copy of the dissertation, (b) one electronic copy of the dissertation, (c) a letter or report from the supervisor, and (d) either (i) an external report or (ii) a letter from an additional member of the dissertation committee. Canadians who completed their dissertations at foreign institutions must also provide proof of citizenship, such as a photocopy or digital scan of a passport.

 

Please address inquiries and applications to this year's Chair of the Committee:

Dr. Lynn Arner
Dept. of English
1812 Sir Isaac Brock Way
Brock University
St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1
Canada

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

[1] The current competition is the transitional year regarding the date parameters for this prize. Henceforth, the year of the award will be announced in the prize title, and the dissertation must have been defended in the stated year. For this competition only, the committee will accept dissertations defended late in 2015 if the PhD was officially conferred in 2016. (However, no dissertation entered in last year’s competition can be re-entered this year.)

Amsterdam University Press is pleased to announce a new scholarly book series, Gendering the Late Medieval and Early Modern World. The General Editors of this series editors are Victoria Burke, University of Ottawa; James Daybell, Plymouth University; Svante Norrhem, Lund University; and Merry Wiesner-Hanks, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

 

This series provides a forum for studies that investigate the themes of women and gender in the late medieval and early modern world.  The editors invite proposals for book-length studies of an interdisciplinary nature, including but not exclusively, from the fields of history, literature, art and architectural history, and visual and material culture.  Consideration will be given to both monographs and collections of essays. Chronologically, we welcome studies that look at the period between 1400 and 1700, with a focus on Britain, Europe and Global transnational histories. We invite proposals including, but not limited to, the following broad themes: methodologies, theories and meanings of gender; gender, power and political culture; monarchs, courts and power; construction of femininity and masculinities; gift-giving, diplomacy and the politics of exchange; gender and the politics of early modern archives and architectural spaces (court, salons, household); consumption and material culture; objects and gendered power; women’s writing; gendered patronage and power; gendered activities, behaviours, rituals and fashions.

 

For more information, or to submit a proposal, visit http://en.aup.nl/series/gendering-the-late-medieval-and-early-modern-world or contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

A series flyer can also be found at

 

https://www.academia.edu/24810622/Series_Announcement_Gendering_the_Late_Medieval_and_Early_Modern_World

The reappearance of alliterative verse in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries remains one of the most puzzling issues in the literary history of medieval England. In From Lawmen to Plowmen, Stephen M. Yeager offers a fresh, insightful explanation for the alliterative structure of William Langland’s Piers Plowman and the flourishing of alliterative verse satires in late medieval England by observing the similarities between these satires and the legal-homiletical literature of the Anglo-Saxon era.

Unlike Old English alliterative poetry, Anglo-Saxon legal texts and documents continued to be studied long after the Norman Conquest. By comparing Anglo-Saxon charters, sermons, and law codes with Langland’s Piers Plowman and similar poems, Yeager demonstrates that this legal and homiletical literature had an influential afterlife in the fourteenth-century poetry of William Langland and his imitators. His conclusions establish a new genealogy for medieval England’s vernacular literary tradition and offer a new way of approaching one of Middle English’s literary classics.

Stephen M. Yeager is an assistant professor in the Department of English at Concordia University. 

From the publisher:

Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia, a groundbreaking study of the intellectual and monastic culture of the Main Valley during the eighth century, looks closely at a group of manuscripts associated with some of the best-known personalities of the European Middle Ages, including Boniface of Mainz and his “beloved,”abbess Leoba of Tauberbischofsheim. This is the first study of these “Anglo-Saxon missionaries to Germany” to delve into the details of their lives by studying the manuscripts that were produced in their scriptoria and used in their communities. The author explores how one group of religious women helped to shape the culture of medieval Europe through the texts they wrote and copied, as well as through their editorial interventions.


Using compelling manuscript evidence, she argues that the content of the women’s books was overwhelmingly gender-egalitarian and frequently feminist (i.e., resistant to patriarchal ideas). This intriguing book provides unprecedented glimpses into the “feminist consciousness” of the women’s and mixed-sex communities that flourished in the early Middle Ages.

 

Felice Lifshitz

Felice Lifshitz is Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and of Religious Studies at the University of Alberta.

From the publisher:

How did medieval Europeans use and change their environments, think about the natural world, and try to handle the natural forces affecting their lives? This groundbreaking environmental history examines medieval relationships with the natural world from the perspective of social ecology, viewing human society as a hybrid of the cultural and the natural. Richard Hoffmann's interdisciplinary approach sheds important light on such central topics in medieval history as the decline of Rome, religious doctrine, urbanization and technology, as well as key environmental themes, among them energy use, sustainability, disease and climate change. Revealing the role of natural forces in events previously seen as purely human, the book explores issues including the treatment of animals, the 'tragedy of the commons', agricultural clearances and agrarian economies. By introducing medieval history in the context of social ecology, it brings the natural world into historiography as an agent and object of history itself.

Richard Hoffmann, York University, Toronto
Richard Hoffmann is Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at the Department of History, York University, Canada. As a pioneer in the environmental history of pre-industrial Europe, he is widely known for his contributions to medieval studies, environmental studies and historic fisheries.

From the publisher:

The Late Byzantine period (1261–1453) is marked by a paradoxical discrepancy between economic weakness and cultural strength. The apparent enigma can be resolved by recognizing that later Byzantine diplomatic strategies, despite or because of diminishing political advantage, relied on an increasingly desirable cultural and artistic heritage. This book reassesses the role of the visual arts in this era by examining the imperial image and the gift as reconceived in the final two centuries of the Byzantine Empire. In particular it traces a series of luxury objects created specifically for diplomatic exchange with such courts as Genoa, Paris and Moscow alongside key examples of imperial imagery and ritual. By questioning how political decline refigured the visual culture of empire, Dr Hilsdale offers a more nuanced and dynamic account of medieval cultural exchange that considers the temporal dimensions of power and the changing fates of empires.

 

Cecily J. Hilsdale, McGill University, Montréal

Cecily J. Hilsdale is Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University. Her research concerns cultural exchange in the medieval Mediterranean, in particular the circulation of Byzantine luxury objects as diplomatic gifts as well as the related dissemination of eastern styles, techniques, and iconographies and ideologies of imperium.

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